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Clockwise from top: Ljubljana Castle in the background and Franciscan Church of the Annunciation in the foreground; Visitation of Mary Church on Rožnik Hill; Kazina Palace at Congress Square; view from Ljubljana Castle towards the north; Ljubljana City Hall; Ljubljanica with the Triple Bridge in distance It has been the cultural, educational, economic, political, and administrative center of independent Slovenia since 1991.

Its central geographic location within Slovenia, transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific and research institutions, and cultural tradition are contributing factors to its leading position.

After they were expelled in 1598, marking the beginning of the Counter-Reformation, Catholic Bishop Thomas Chrön ordered the public burning of eight cartloads of Protestant books.

In 1597, Jesuits arrived in the city, followed in 1606 by the Capuchins, to eradicate Protestantism.

The origin from the Slavic ljub- "to love, like" was in 2007 supported as the most probable by the linguist Tijmen Pronk, a specialist in comparative Indo-European linguistics and Slovene dialectology, from the University of Leiden.

argued at the same place for the thesis that the name Ljubljana derives from Ljubija, the original name of the Ljubljanica River flowing through it, itself derived from the Old Slavic male name Ljubovid, "the one of a lovely appearance".

) The city is alternatively named Lublana in many English language documents.

For most scholars, the problem has been in how to connect the Slovene and the German names.

According to a Slavic myth, the slaying of a dragon releases the waters and ensures the fertility of the earth, and it is thought that the myth is tied to the Ljubljana Marshes, the expansive marshy area that periodically threatens Ljubljana with flooding.

According to the historian Peter Štih's deduction, this happened between 11, thus representing the earliest mention of Ljubljana.

Originally owned by a number of possessors, until the first half of the 12th century, the territory south of the Sava where the town of Ljubljana developed gradually became property of the Carinthian family of the Dukes of Sponheim.) remains—was established with a synagogue, and lasted until Emperor Maximilian I in 1515 succumbed to medieval antisemitism and expelled Jews from Ljubljana, for which he demanded a certain payment from the town.

These lake-dwelling people lived through hunting, fishing and primitive agriculture.

To get around the marshes, they used dugout canoes made by cutting out the inside of tree trunks.

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